The Abandoned Koppers Coke Oven Plant Ruins Along the Gaylord Donnely Trail

The Abandoned Koppers Coke Oven Plant Ruins Along the Gaylord Donnely Trail

The Koppers Coke Plant ruins are on and around the Gaylord Donnely Trail, in the Illinois and Michigan Canal, city of Fairmont and Lockport, Will County, Illinois.

The Abandoned Koppers Coke Oven Plant Ruins Along the Gaylord Donnely Trail

Heinrich Koppers was the father of the Koppers Coke Oven that he created in 1904. It was an oven that turned coal into coke, a productive fuel, in a more superior manner than former coke ovens. Heinrich Koppers coke ovens economically recover the byproduct chemicals of the coking process which caused his business to flourish. Mr. Kopper was brought from Germany to America by Joilet Iron and Steel Works to build and use his new more productive coke ovens in 1907. The first coke ovens in the United States were built by Kopper in Joilet, Illinois.

In 1912, Kopper started his own business, the H. Koppers Company in Chicago. Heinrich Koppers sold the patents for his by-product coke ovens to Andrew Mellon in 1914 for $300,000 USD.

Koppers is still a busy company to this day with the current headquarters being located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The Abandoned Koppers Coke Oven Plant Ruins Along the Gaylord Donnely Trail

The Abandoned Koppers Coke Oven Plant Ruins Along the Gaylord Donnely Trail

The Abandoned Koppers Coke Oven Plant Ruins Along the Gaylord Donnely Trail

The Abandoned Koppers Coke Oven Plant Ruins Along the Gaylord Donnely Trail

The Abandoned Koppers Coke Oven Plant Ruins Along the Gaylord Donnely Trail

The Abandoned Koppers Coke Oven Plant Ruins Along the Gaylord Donnely Trail

The Abandoned Koppers Coke Oven Plant Ruins Along the Gaylord Donnely Trail

Where are the abandoned ruins of the Kopper Coke Plant located? You can find it with these coordinates. 41.563573,-88.074047.

The Abandoned Koppers Coke Oven Plant Ruins Along the Gaylord Donnely Trail

All images used under Creative Commons License Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 2.0 Generic. All images by Eric Alex Rogers / Flickr / reallyboring.

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